EPA gives coal plants new chance

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration ordered a sweeping about-face Wednesday on Obama-era efforts to fight climate change, easing restrictions on coal-fired power plants in a move it predicted would revitalize America’s sagging coal industry.

As miners in hard hats and coal-country lawmakers applauded, Environmental Protection Agency chief Andrew Wheeler signed a measure that scraps one of President Barack Obama’s key initiatives to rein in fossil fuel emissions. The replacement rule gives states more leeway in deciding whether to require plants to make limited efficiency upgrades.

Wheeler said he expects more coal plants to open as a result. But one state, New York, immediately said it would go to court to challenge the action, and more lawsuits are likely.

The EPA move follows pledges by candidate and then President Donald Trump to rescue the U.S. coal industry, which saw near-record numbers of plant closings last year in the face of competition from cheaper natural gas and renewables. It’s the latest and one of the biggest of dozens of environmental regulatory rollbacks by his administration.

It came despite scientists’ cautions that the world must cut fossil fuel emissions to stave off the worst of global warming and the EPA’s own analysis that the new rule would result in the deaths of an extra 300 to 1,500 people each year by 2030 compared to the never fully enacted Clean Power Plan, owing to additional air pollution from the power grid.

“Americans want reliable energy that they can afford,” Wheeler declared at the signing ceremony, with White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney alongside to underscore Trump’s approval.

There’s no denying “fossil fuels will continue to be an important part of the mix,” Wheeler said.

Lawmakers and industry representatives from coal states blamed federal regulation, not the market, for the decades-long trend of declining U.S. coal use and said Wednesday’s act would stave off more coal plant closings.

“We’re not ready for renewable energy … so we need coal,” declared Rep. David McKinley, a West Virginia Republican.

But rather than a sensible economic move, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi described the change as a “dirty power scam” and “a stunning giveaway to big polluters.” She called climate change “the existential threat of our time” and said the administration was ignoring scientific studies and yielding to special interests.

Obama’s 2015 Clean Power Plan is currently stayed by the Supreme Court while challenges play out from more than two dozen states that contend it exceeded authority under the federal Clean Air Act.

Environmental advocates and Obama-era EPA officials involved in drafting the now-repealed plan said Trump’s replacement rule will do little to cut climate-damaging emissions from coal-fired power plants, at a time when polls show Americans are increasingly paying attention to global warming.

COMMENTS