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Muir Library hosting history

March 15, 2013
Jodelle Greiner - Staff Writer , Fairmont Sentinel

WINNEBAGO - History will come alive when George Nelson steps out of the past Wednesday at the Muir Library.

Actually, an actor from the Minnesota History Center will portray George Nelson, a fur trade clerk who lived from 1786-1859.

Library director Heidi Schutt said the presentation will run from 7-8 p.m., followed by refreshments.

Article Photos

“George Nelson”

"People can ask questions and look at the artifacts he brings," she said.

There is no admission charge to attend.

"I don't know a lot about George Nelson, maybe that's what draws him to me," Schutt said. "I'm looking forward to just learning about him at the program."

The Muir has hosted History Center players before.

"People from the Minnesota Historical Society are so knowledgeable about the period in history they are playing," Schutt said. "Educational and entertaining."

Last summer at the Muir, a history player portrayed Maud Hart Lovelace, who wrote the Betsy-Tacy series and grew up in Mankato.

"People who attended loved the event," Schutt said. "She stayed in character the whole time she was here, even while she was packing up her stuff."

The History Center has a whole cast of historical people for audiences to enjoy.

"They're always introducing new ones," said Schutt, adding that Winnebago Area Museum hosted an actor portraying Virginia Mae Hope, who served during World War II as a Women Airforce Service pilot.

"She was either born or had relatives in Winnebago," Schutt said.

The event with George Nelson will be family-friendly, Schutt said, especially good for older elementary and middle school students.

She knows presentations such as this one can have an impact on kids that age.

"I remember them coming to the elementary school when I was in school, so this isn't a new thing," she said. "I remember being fascinated."

The program is funded by the state Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund and costs $150, Schutt said.

 
 

 

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